GREENLAND GLACIERS MELTING

Examiner, Launceston, Tas. Thursday 1 February 1940ggmelt1940

Is the Arctic climate becoming more temperate?

Remarkable new information, given by the famous Swedish authority, Professor H. Wilson Ahlmann, in a lecture to the Swedish Geographical Society, suggests that this may be the case.

Professor Ahlmann was speaking on the collated results of his expedition last summer to north-east Greenland, where he has been making glaciological studies on Clavering Island, in connection with his earlier researches in the most northerly parts of the Atlantic.

The address was given before a brilliant assembly of scientists, and was illustrated by an array of magnificent colour photographs. Professor Ahtmann stated that the glaciers of north-east Greenland show clear signs of a change towards a warmer climate.

As has been observed in other parts of the Arctic, especially in Spitzbergen, the melting has in- creased rapidly. All, or at any rate by far the largest number of glaciers in north-east Greenland have receded very greatly during recent decades, and it would not be exaggerating to say that these glaciers are nearing a catastrophe.

For the local fauna the latest mild winter has had calamitous consequences, especially for the musk oxen, a most peculiar animal, which is in fact a living fossil, the lecturer stated, for it does not belong to our chronological age, but to the Ice Age, which ended thousands of years ago.

Until only a few years ago, lemmings, hares, and musk oxen were to be found in abundant numbers in north-east Greenland. After the autumn rains last year came a period of intense cold, and a thick layer of ice was formed over the ground.

This prevented the musk oxen and other animals from working down to the earth and getting food, with the consequence that many died of starvation, while others fled to other districts.

The material obtained by the expedition has so far only been preliminarily collated, and the measurements it instituted will not be completed until next August. One of the members of the expedition has remained on Clavering Island over the winter, to continue these measurements.

A comprehensive system of wireless communications has been established between this collaborator and Professor Ahlmann in Stockholm, and, thanks to this communication, the latter was able to quote very up-to-date results in his recent lecture.

http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/92656067

Courier Mail, Monday 6 may 1940glmilder1940

Is the Arctic climate becoming more temperate? Remarkable new information given by the famous Swedish authority, Professor H. W. Ahlmann in a lecture to the Swedish Geographical Society, suggests that this may be the case.

Professor Ahlmann was speaking on the collated results of his expedition to north-east Greenland, and he stated that the glaciers there showed clear signs of a change towards a warmer climate.

As had been observed in other parts of the Arctic, especially in Spitzbergen, the melting had increased rapidly. By far the largest number of local glaciers in north-east Greenland had receded very greatly during recent decades, and it would not be exaggerating to say that these glaciers were nearing a catastrophe

http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/40934044

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